For US healthcare professionals only. Prescribing Information

Proven prevention of delayed CINV (25-120 h)

VARUBI® is the only NK-1RA with a long half-life of ≈7 days, lasting through the delayed CINV phase following chemotherapy1

One dose of VARUBI (rolapitant), as part of an antiemetic regimen, significantly improved complete response (CR) rates in the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV, 25-120 h)2,3

VARUBI met its primary endpoint of CR (no vomiting or administration of rescue medication) in the delayed phase of CINV in three independent phase 3 studies of highly and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC and MEC) in a combined 2,402 patients.1


VARUBI increased CR rates (no vomiting or rescue medication) in the delayed phase of CINV2,3

Chart showing how VARUBI increased CR rates in the delayed phase of CINV

aHEC study 1, 95% CI for delayed CR: 6.3, 22.4; VARUBI n = 264, control n = 262.1 bHEC study 2, 95% CI for delayed CR: 0.3, 16.1; VARUBI n = 271, control n = 273.1 cMEC study, 95% CI for delayed CR: 4.7, 14.8; VARUBI n = 666, control n = 666.1 dSince the start of the study, AC has been reclassified as HEC.4 Types of MEC included in this study were carboplatin, cyclophosphamide (<1,500 mg/m2), and irinotecan.3 AC, anthracycline and cyclophosphamide; CI, confidence interval; CR, complete response (no vomiting or administration of rescue medication); HEC, highly emetogenic chemotherapy; MEC, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

Efficacy in multiple-cycle extensions

In HEC studies 1 and 2 and the MEC study, patients had the option of continuing into a multiple-cycle extension for up to 5 additional cycles of chemotherapy, receiving the same treatment as assigned in cycle 1. At days 6 through 8 following initiation of chemotherapy, patients were asked to recall whether they had any episode of vomiting or retching or nausea that interfered with normal daily life.3 Approximately 71%-87% of patients reported no emesis and no nausea interfering with daily life.5

Adverse reactions

  • In patients receiving cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy in cycle 1, the most common adverse reactions reported at a frequency of ≥5% and greater than control were neutropenia (9% VARUBI vs 8% control) and hiccups (5% vs 4%)

  • In patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and combinations of anthracycline and cyclophosphamide in cycle 1, the most common adverse reactions reported at a frequency of ≥5% and greater than control were decreased appetite (9% VARUBI vs 7% control), neutropenia (7% vs 6%), and dizziness (6% vs 4%)

Evaluated in three phase 3 pivotal trials

An antiemetic regimen containing VARUBI was compared with an active-controlled antiemetic regimen in three phase 3, double-blind, global clinical trials1-3

VARUBI

Varubi

Active control

Active control

5-HT3 RA, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (serotonin) receptor antagonist.

All phase 3, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, global clinical trials examined the administration of VARUBI or placebo in combination with granisetron and dexamethasone.1-3

  • Patients were randomized to receive VARUBI or placebo on day 1 prior to chemotherapy2,3
  • Both VARUBI and placebo groups received granisetron and dexamethasone, followed by chemotherapy administration2,3
  • Events of emesis and use of rescue medication were recorded for 5 days2,3

Primary endpoint was complete response (CR, no vomiting or administration of rescue medication) in the delayed phase of CINV (25-120 h)1

Study design was similar across three phase 3 trials

Study design: HEC studies 1 and 2

aGranisetron dosing on day 1 prior to chemotherapy was 10 mcg/kg IV.3 bDexamethasone dosing on day 1 prior to chemotherapy was 20 mg PO. Dosing on days 2-4 was 8 mg BID PO.3 5-HT3, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (serotonin); BID, twice a day; CR, complete response; HEC, highly emetogenic chemotherapy; PO, by mouth; RA, receptor antagonist.

For HEC studies 1 and 2, patients received a chemotherapy regimen that included cisplatin >60 mg/m2.1

Study design: MEC study

aGranisetron dosing on day 1 prior to chemotherapy was 2 mg PO. Granisetron dosing on days 2-3 was 2 mg PO daily.3 bDexamethasone dosing on day 1 prior to chemotherapy was 20 mg PO.3 5-HT3, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (serotonin); AC, anthracycline and cyclophosphamide; AUC, area under the curve; CR, complete response; HEC, highly emetogenic chemotherapy; MEC, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy; PO, by mouth; RA, receptor antagonist.

For the MEC study, more than half of patients in the VARUBI and control groups received AC-based chemotherapy (a combination of an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide), which has since been reclassified as highly emetogenic.3,4 Of non–AC-based MEC, carboplatin was the most commonly administered chemotherapy, comprising 29% of patients in the VARUBI group and 31% of patients in the control group. Other MEC included cyclophosphamide (<1,500 mg/m2) and irinotecan.3 Since the time of this study, both carboplatin dosed at area under the curve (AUC) ≥4 and any combination of anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) have been reclassified as HEC.3,4

Patient demographics

The VARUBI and control groups were balanced with respect to age, sex, nationality, alcohol consumption, primary tumor site, and type of chemotherapy administered.2,3

References: 1.VARUBI® Prescribing Information, TerSera Therapeutics LLC  2. Rapoport BL, Chasen MR, Gridelli C, et al. Safety and efficacy of rolapitant for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting after administration of cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy in patients with cancer: two randomized, active-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trials. Lancet Oncol. 2015;16(9):1079-1089. 3. Schwartzberg LS, Modiano MR, Rapoport BL, et al. Safety and efficacy of rolapitant for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting after administration of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens in patients with cancer: a randomised, active-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. 2015;16(9):1071-1078. 4. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Antiemesis v.3.2018. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc., 2018. All rights reserved. Accessed September 24, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 5. Data on file. TerSera Therapeutics LLC